What’s my Coin Worth?

This is a common question LCR Coin receives daily via email or phone. We are creating this page to help answer these questions. LCR Coin cannot determine the value or authenticity of a coin over the phone. It is impossible to know without physically looking at the coin.

I Saw on your Website that you Have a Coin Listed for $9500, I have that same coin, so is mine worth the same price?

1. All of our coins have been graded and certified by PCGS and NGC. These are the two top most respected coin grading services in the United States. After a coin has been graded by NGC or PCGS, they are encapsulated into a plastic holder and given a unique serial number that identifies that coin. The encapsulation of that coin by that grading services guarantees the coins condition. You will then be able to enter in the serial number on the grading services website and view the coins picture, population, mint mark, and other coin facts.

2. A rare coin’s value is based a few key factors. The first being the grade or condition of the coin. The grade is determined by preservation, strike, luster, color and attractiveness. The coin is then given a grade based on Sheldon’s Grading Scale of 1 through 70. 2nd, the value of a rare coin is driven from the population (rarity) of the coin. 3rd. is the date of a coin. Common Dates, Key Dates and Hard to find Dates. A common date coin will be worth less than a Key Date or a Hard to Find Date.

I am looking at the coin and it’s in a cardboard holder with a grade written on it.

There is no way to know who really wrote that on the cardboard holder and how long ago someone wrote that grade down. A Professional Numismatist would need to evaluate your coin(s) and it would need to be professionally certified and graded by NGC or PCGS to get the most value. Serious collectors only have NGC and PCGS Certified and graded coins in their collections. A cardboard holder does NOT preserve the coins condition, nor has it been certified or professionally graded.

Then how do I find out What’s My Coin Worth?

Because the coin(s) physically needs to be looked at we suggest taking your coin(s) to a local coin shop in your area. Make sure they are a reputable coin dealer and NOT a pawn shop. The coin shop can determine the value and authenticity of your coin. In the event they think it’s a rare coin that will grade, the coin should be sent to NGC or PCGS for certification and grading (this is rare), we can always assist you by submitting your coin to the grading service of your choice for a small fee.